These 600 New Babies Make Another Reason to Visit Singapore Wildlife Parks

These 600 New Babies Make Another Reason to Visit Singapore Wildlife Parks

Fluffy, scaly, small, giant – these 600 babies in Singapore Wildlife Parks come in all forms and we can’t wait to meet them!

Image credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Jurong Bird Park, Night Safari, River Safari and Singapore Zoo have reported over 600 animal births and hatchings in 2016, and among them are highly threatened Southeast Asian animals. These include the Sunda pangolin, painted terrapin, proboscis monkey, Bali mynah and black-winged starling, all of which are on the brink of extinction.

Wildlife Reserves Singapore aims to protect and conserve biodiversity in Singapore and the region, with its animal care team breeding some of the rarest Southeast Asian animals in 2016.

Image credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

In April 2016, Singapore Zoo saw the birth of nine painted terrapins, one of Southeast Asia’s most endangered freshwater turtle species, and another proboscis monkey baby, an endangered primate native to the island of Borneo. Since 1999, Singapore Zoo has seen 30 proboscis monkey births and Singapore lays claim to the highest number of proboscis monkey births outside of their native Indonesia.

Image credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Southeast Asian animal births in Night Safari include Neha, the juvenile Asian elephant born on 12 May who charmed her way to fame with her playful antics. The park also welcomed a fifth successful birth of the critically endangered Sunda pangolin since 2011, on 7 October. This makes Night Safari one of the most successful wildlife parks in the world in caring for and breeding the world’s most trafficked mammal.

Image credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Two Malayan tapirs born in October and December brought up the park’s impressive track record to 30 successful births to date.

Image credit: Wildlife Reserves Singapore

Threatened Southeast Asian species continue to thrive at Jurong Bird Park, with the hatchings of three black-winged starlings and four Bali mynahs, both species critically endangered due to their popularity in the illegal songbird trade. The park works closely with organisations like Begawan Foundation and Cikananga Conservation Breeding Centre in Indonesia who are striving to safeguard a population of these rare birds, and hope to eventually reintroduce them to their native habitats.


Information is extracted from Press Release issued by Wildlife Reserves Singapore.

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