Taiwan’s Cherry Blossoms 2018 Forecast: When & Where to Catch Them?

Taiwan’s Cherry Blossoms 2018 Forecast: When & Where to Catch Them?

Here’s the only guide to the best cherry blossom viewing spots in Taiwan you need for the year.

We often think of Japan and Korea at the mention of cherry blossoms (or Sakura), and indeed those two countries have some of the most stunning sights, but we’re missing out on the hidden gem that is Taiwan. If you don’t already know, Sakura season in Taiwan is little earlier than the aforementioned countries’, mostly commencing in January and ending by March. So it’s not too late to start planning your trip now! Want to know when and where to catch the flowers in full bloom this year? Check out our guide below.

Alishan National Scenic Area: Late January to Mid April

Image credit: 張 婉君

Fun fact for those travelling to Taipei for the first time: Alishan National Scenic Area is one of the country’s most recognised and visited parks. Thousands of visitors make their way here every year for its famous forest railway and endless rows of Yoshino cherry trees (the most you’ll find in Taiwan).

There are dozens of flower types that can be found here – Taiwanese Sakura (which bloom from late January to March), Yoshino Cherries (which bloom from mid March to late April), and Double-Layer Sakura (which bloom from February to March). This is why there is a three-month date range! Even though it may get crowded, the park is huge. So fret not, you’ll definitely find a quiet spot to admire the delicate blossoms, and even other amazing sights like the vast mountain valleys during sunset, or the canopy of clouds above.

Pingjing St Lane 42, Taipei: Late January to Mid Feb

cherry blossoms taiwan 2019

Image credit: Menqchyi Kuo

Who said you had to leave the city to catch a glimpse of these pink beauties? There’s no need to travel hours out into the countryside if you’re tight on time. Simply make your way to Pingjing St Lane 42, a quiet street lined with Fuji cherry blossom trees, nestled within Taipei’s Shilin District (yes, less than an hour away from the famous Shilin Night Market). Compared to the other places on our list, this street remains less known to tourists and a secret amongst locals. Its stunning display of flora is also the first to appear in the country, marking the beginning of spring in Taiwan and lasting only through January.

Wuling Farm: Mid February to Early March

Image credit: chifei

Wuling Farm’s lush greenery, exotic flora, and peaceful natural settings makes it a top attraction amongst tourists all year round. As soon as spring commences and the dozens of cherry blossoms fully bloom, the farm and its mountainous surroundings transform into a magical wonderland.

The farm is also home to several fruit farms, an attractive waterfall, and local wildlife, offering tons to explore even when you’re done snapping your photos of the scenery. Oh, and plan your visit during the month of February (no later than the first week of March) to be safe timing is important!

Tianyuan Temple, Danshui: Mid February to Mid March

Image credit: Sinchen Lin

Ask any Taipei local for recommendations on where to catch the blooms and chances are they’ll mention Tianyuan Temple. The majestic Taoist temple is situated in the quiet countryside in the Danshui district of New Taipei City (just outside Taipei), and can be reached within a 30-minute bus ride from Tamsui MRT Station. Besides the temple’s grand interiors, there’s also a huge garden showcasing a wide array of exotic flora on the temple grounds which draws heaps of locals (who have gone to the extent of keeping tabs on the flowering progress)!

Don’t want to miss the unparallelled beauty of Tianyuan Temple during cherry blossom season? Your best bet would be to head down in between mid February and mid March.

Yangmingshan National Park: Mid February to Mid March

cherry blossoms taiwan 2019

Image credit: Ares Hsu

A vacation in Taipei is almost incomplete without a day trip to Yangmingshan National Park even more so if you’re travelling during cherry blossom season! Spanning over 114 square metres  of mountainous terrain on Northern Taipei, the park is home to a natural hot springs, numerous hiking trails, sulfur lakes, and Taiwan’s largest volcano, the Seven Star Mountain.

If that already sounds impressive, just imagine the place during spring (and the annual Yangmingshan Flower Festival), adorned with cherry blossoms, peonies, hydrangeas, camellias, and peach blossoms. And in case you were wondering: Yangmingshan is easily accessible via bus rides from various MRT stations located within Taipei. So say goodbye to any transportation nightmares!

Wulai Scenic Area: Late February to Early March

Image credit: Ian Chen, Jaewon Choi

If you can’t make it to Yangmingshan, consider Wulai Scenic Area instead. This quaint mountainous village is a scenic location like its name suggests, and is also known for its traditional food street (Wulai Old Street), natural hot springs, and indigenous culture. Take our advice and indulge in a wild boar sausage as you marvel at the cherry trees boasting pink petals. Then take a dip in a hot spring it’s the best way to let your body rejuvenate after walking about cold and rainy Taipei. A visit between late February and early March would be most ideal, so keep that in mind and plan your itinerary wisely!

There you have it! Those are our picks on the best cherry blossom viewing spots in Taiwan. If reading this article has gotten you all heart-eye emoji over the gorgeous flora, what’s stopping you from treating yourself to the real deal? Hopefully our list has given you that travel inspiration you needed.

About Author

Teri Anne Tan

If she's not binging on Korean BBQ on a night out with her friends, Teri Anne is most probably at home rewatching Studio Ghibli films or planning her next trip abroad. She loves reading, indulging in clothing hauls, and listening to hits from both K-pop and '80s British Rock. Her ultimate dream? To enjoy a mug of hot chocolate under the Northern Lights in Iceland.

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